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Summer Assignments for Grades 9-12

English I: Freshman English Summer Reading

Grade 9

Read one of the following:

A Dog’s Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron

Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

The Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

Tuesdays With Morrie by Mitch Albom

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card


Pre-AP Grade 9

Required: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway


PLUS one of the following (your choice):

The Chosen by Chaim Potok 

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

Half Broke Horses by Janette Walls

Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon

English II: Sophomore Summer Reading

Welcome to your Sophomore year at Lutheran South Academy!  I am very excited to be able to work with each one of you this next year in order to help you become better readers and writers.  One of the best ways to become a reader is to be able to comprehend all the signs, patterns and symbols that authors give us to help infer and decipher the meaning they want us to capture.  Thomas C. Foster has identified most of the symbols, archetypes and patterns that recur throughout literature as signposts to meaning in his book, How to Read Literature like a Professor, a reference book to help you understand these major symbols, allusions, archetypes and patterns found within literature. Mixing quick wit and sharp intellectual insights, this reference book discusses different ways to analyze and break apart a text in order to truly illuminate all the layers within complex works of literature.
 
ASSIGNMENT This summer, you are to read a novel from list below along with selected chapters from How to Read Literature Like a Professor, and complete the questions in a journal to be turned in on the first day of class.

 

How to Read Literature Like a Professor:
A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines
by Thomas C. Foster

 

****Make sure you have the revised edition****

 

The first two weeks of class we will be working exclusively with the material in How to Read Literature Like a Professor. We will be reading and studying the remaining chapters and working with each one using the novel you read over the summer. **Quizzes and a Final Test will be given over the material in How to Read Literature Like a Professor.

Choose one of the following novels to read in conjunction with Foster’s Book:

Legend by Marie Lu 
Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys 
The Running Dream by Wendelin Van Draanen 
Son by Lois Lowry
 All the Right Stuff by Walter Dean Myer
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

I highly suggest spreading the reading of How to Read Literature Like a Professor out, taking time to truly let Foster’s advice to sink in. Try to think of how Foster’s explanations in each of the chapters applies to the novel you have selected to read.

Please note that your responses should be one or two paragraphs -- not pages! Your answers should be written in complete sentences and should be at least a half a page each.

THEY MUST BE HAND WRITTEN IN A COMPOSITION NOTEBOOK TO BE HANDED IN AT THE BEGINNING OF SCHOOL.

 

 

 

Writing Assignments for How to Read Literature Like a Professor

 

Chapter 1 --Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It's Not)-
List the five aspects of the QUEST and then apply them to the novel you have read in the form used on pgs 3-5. Explain the events in the story that represents each element of the quest in your novel.

Chapter 4 --Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?-
Define intertextuality. Discuss three examples (scenes or plots) from your novel that have you have also seen in other works or movies.

Chapter 10-Never Stand Next to the Hero-
Think of an example, from either your novel or movies you have watched, of when a character perished or was hurt do to being too close to the Hero. What is the problem with being best pals with the hero? What purpose does the death of a friend serve? Be sure to lay the groundwork to the story and how the character was affected. Remember the death has to spur the Hero forward, it cannot be innocent by standers in a rampage.

Chapter 12 --Is That a Symbol?-
What’s the difference between symbolism and allegory? What impacts a readers’ understanding of symbolic meaning? What, besides objects, can be symbolic? How should a reader approach symbolism in a text? What questions should the reader ask of the text when trying to determine symbolic meaning? What are some of the symbols in your novel and what do they symbolize?

Chapter 21 --Marked for Greatness-
Harry Potter's scar is more than just a mark on his forehead. Select a character from your novel, or another character with a physical imperfection and analyze its implications for the character.

 

Happy Reading!  If you have any questions, feel free to email me:  robin.quinton@lutheransouth.org

 

Download Assignment (PDF)

English II: Pre-AP Sophomore Summer Reading

Welcome to your Sophomore year at Lutheran South Academy! I am very excited to be able to work with each one of you this next year in order to help you become better readers and writers. One of the best ways to become a reader is to be able to comprehend all the signs, patterns and symbols that authors give us to help infer and decipher the meaning they want us to capture. Thomas C. Foster has identified most of the symbols, archetypes and patterns that recur throughout literature as signposts to meaning in his book, How to Read Literature like a Professor, a reference book to help you understand these major symbols, allusions, archetypes and patterns found within literature. Mixing quick wit and sharp intellectual insights, this reference book discusses different ways to analyze and break apart a text in order to truly illuminate all the layers within complex works of literature.

ASSIGNMENT

This summer, you are to read a novel from the following list, along with selected chapters from How to Read Literature Like a Professor, and complete the following questions in a journal to be turned in on the first day of class.

How to Read Literature Like a Professor:
A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines
by Thomas C. Foster

****Make sure you have the revised edition****

**The first two weeks of class we will be working exclusively with the material in How to Read Literature Like a Professor. We will be reading and studying the remaining chapters and working with each one using the novel you read over the summer.

**Quizzes and a Final Test will be given over the material in How to Read Literature Like a Professor.

 

Choose one of the following novels to read in conjunction with Foster’s Book:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy

 

I highly suggest spreading out the reading of How to Read Literature Like a Professor, taking time to truly let Foster’s advice to sink in. Try to think of how Foster’s explanations in each of the chapters applies to the novel you have selected to read.

Please note that your responses should be one or two paragraphs -- not pages! Your answers should be concise and written in complete sentences and should be at least a half a page each. THEY MUST BE HAND WRITTEN IN A COMPOSITION NOTEBOOK TO BE HANDED IN AT THE BEGINNING OF SCHOOL

 

 

Writing Assignments for How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Chapter 1 -- Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It's Not)-          List the five aspects of the QUEST and then apply them to the novel you           have read in the form used on pgs 3-5. Explain the events in the story that represents each element of the quest in your novel.

Chapter 4 --Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?- Define intertextuality. Discuss three examples (scenes or plots) from your novel that             have you have also seen in other works or movies.

Chapter 10- Never Stand Next to the Hero- Think of an example, from either your novel or movies you have watched, of when a character             perished or was hurt do to being too close to the Hero. What is the problem with being best pals with the hero? What purpose does       the death of a friend serve? Be sure to lay the groundwork to the story and how the character was affected. Remember the death has            to spur the Hero forward, it cannot be innocent by standers in a rampage.

Chapter 12 -- Is That a Symbol?- What’s the difference between symbolism and allegory? What impacts a readers’ understanding of             symbolic meaning? What, besides objects, can be symbolic? How should a reader approach symbolism in a text? What questions             should the reader ask of the text when trying to determine symbolic meaning? What are some of the symbols in your novel and             what do they symbolize?

Chapter 21 -- Marked for Greatness- Harry Potter's scar is more than just a mark on his forehead. Select a character from your novel, or             another character with a physical imperfection and analyze its implications for the character.

Happy Reading! If you have any questions, feel free to email me:  robin.quinton@lutheransouth.org

 

Download Assignment (PDF) 

 

English III: Junior Summer Reading

Welcome to English III! I hope that you find the class both enlightening and enjoyable. For the 2018-2019 school year, you will be required to complete this summer reading assignment.

 

It will be due the SECOND week of school when we return in August.

 

Choose one of the following texts:

 

  •      Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline
  •      Bone Gap by Laura Ruby
  •      The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein
  •      I am Malala by Malala Yousafzaiand Christina Lamb
  •      The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  •      Anthem by Ayn Rand
  •      The Alchemist by Paula Coelho

 

Then complete the following assignments.

  • Using five different high lighters, annotate the novel in this fashion:
  •       In GREEN, highlight 10 examples of characterization (direct or indirect).
  •       In BLUE, highlight 10 examples of figurative language.
  •       In PINK, highlight 10 examples of rhetorical devices or appeals. Be sure to label the device in the margin.
  •       In YELLOW, highlight 10 examples of syntactical structures (verbal phrases, sentence uniqueness, various repetitive devices, etc.).
  •       In ORANGE, highlight 10 examples of sensory imagery.

 

Make sure that your annotations are noted throughout the ENTIRE book. There should not be colored annotations in only the first few chapters, or in one particular section of the book only. If you have a digital copy of the book, you will need to complete your annotations on separate paper.

 

  •      You will complete an essay and various other assignments over this book during the first two weeks of the school year. Be sure you have the book with you each day the first week back. This includes digital versions if applicable.

 

English IV: Senior Summer Reading

Grade 12
Read one of the following:

 

Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

 

This novel will be necessary for the first major assignment.

AP Literature and Composition 2019

Dear AP Literature and Composition Students,

Welcome! I am looking forward to getting to see some of you again in class and getting to know those who are new. We have such an amazing year ahead of us, and we will begin our journey towards the AP Test by building our repertoire of literature. This summer you will read one book in preparation for AP Literature and Composition.

Choose one book from the following:

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Peace Like a River by Leif Enger

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo

East of Eden by John Steinbeck

The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

Yellow Raft in Blue Water by Michael Dorris

 

*****Required for new students to LSA within the last two years*****

How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

(2014, Revised Edition)

 

Your SUMMER ASSIGNMENT will consist of four major parts:
 
  • Part I: Read the novel
  • Part II: Annotate for Theme and Analysis-This annotation will be checked on the first day of school and will be used in conversations throughout the first few weeks of the semester. I will check your book (so be sure to have it with  you) and you will be graded on the quality and quantity of your active reading. These novels will also be used for various assignments throughout the first weeks of school including our first timed AP essay.

  • Part III: Complete Novel Notes for the book-After reading your novel, write a report using the following format. Be sure you answer all the questions as completely as you can and still keep your answers brief and concise. Your responses should come from your own impressions after you read the work. Do not consult outside  sources such as on-line sources or "Cliff's Notes"-type sources. The purpose of the assignment is for you to think about what you have read and organize your thoughts coherently into notes that will help you in class discussions and on the exam at  the end of the year.
  1. Setting.
    • Describe the time and place in which the action occurs.
    • How is it related to the time period in which the work was written?
    • What is especially significant about the setting?
  2. Plot.
    • Give a brief summary of the plot, using the following formats of plot structure:
      1. Exposition, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement
    • Discuss any plot devices which have a significant impact on the work
  3. Character.
    • Give a brief description of each of the major characters in the work, and discuss that character's importance/significant impact on the work as a whole.
    • Briefly discuss any minor characters which play an important role in understanding the work as a whole.
  4. Point of View.
    • What is the perspective of the narrator?
    • How does the point of view affect your understanding of the work as a whole?
    • Does the choice of narrator(s) make an impact on the author's message (theme)?
  5. Theme.
    • Identify the message(s) the author communicating? (Briefly explain each theme you identify.)
  6. Literary Devices.
    • Identify any specific devices which affected your reading/understanding of this work and the author's message(s).
    • Briefly explain the use of the device and how it affected your reading of this work.
    • You should examine devices such as diction, syntax, symbolism, metaphor, imagery, irony, or any other element the author uses which has a noticeable impact on any part of the work.
  7. Recommendation.
    • Did you like this work?
    • Why or why not?
    • Would you recommend it to others?
  •  Part IV: Review Literary Devices: These are devices that you should be familiar with prior to coming into AP Literature and will be tested on the first week we are back in class.  We will spend the year adding to your library of literary devices, and learning how they aid in understanding. Please know and be able to apply the following literary devices by the first day of  class. You will take multiple application tests on this material within the first weeks of school as well as use these devices in our discussions throughout the year. Since this is a college class, I expect you to have a solid understanding of literary and poetic devices. In order to pull apart literature, you must know the tools authors use to tell their stories. All of these devices   should be review for you from your previous English classes. You will need to know the definitions and be able to apply the material when you get to the first day of class.

 

Literary Devices

 

Sound Devices:

Alliteration

Assonance

Consonance

Rhyme

End Rhyme

Internal Rhyme

Rhythm

Meter

Foot

Onomatopoeia

Repetition

 

Figurative Language:

Hyperbole

Understatement

Personification

Metaphor

Simile

Allusion

Imagery

Symbol

Idiom

Irony

            1. Situational Irony

            2. Dramatic Irony

            3. Verbal Irony

 

Other Literary Devices/Definitions:

Diction

Tone

Mood

Style

Syntax

Foreshadowing

Connotation

Denotation

Elements of Fiction:

Plot

1. Exposition.

2. Inciting Incident

3. Rising Action

4. Climax

5. Falling Action

6. Resolution

7. Denouement

Point of View

Conflict

1. Man vs. Man

2. Man vs. Nature

3. Man vs. Society

4. Man vs. Fate/God

5. Man vs. Self

Character

1. Protagonist

2. Antagonist

3. Round Character

4. Flat Character

5. Dynamic Character

6. Static Character

Setting

Theme

 

 

About AP Literature and Composition

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is a unique opportunity in that students are afforded the chance to work with other highly motivated and capable students for the purpose of analyzing literature. Through group interaction and discussion, students will gain a deeper appreciation of literature and see, firsthand, the importance of truly listening to diverse opinions. We will spend the year, not only reading novels, but we will also focus on short stories and poetry. Although you will learn and apply practical strategies for dealing with A.P. style test questions in preparation for the exam in May, you will also experience the “essence” of a college course. In addition to preparing for this test, our main goal will be to prepare you for the challenges that you will face as a college freshman. 

On a more personal note, I am truly looking forward to this class becoming a collaborative effort between you and me. Through class discussion and sharing of ideas, we will function as a community of learners. If you are committed to and focused on the work, this class will ultimately become one in which we are all teachers and students. Each of us will have a voice. We have a lot to offer each other and I, for one, can’t wait to get started!

Good luck and happy reading! Feel free to email me over the summer if you have ANY questions or concerns.

~Mrs. Quinton  quinton@lutheransouth.org

 

Download Assignment (PDF)

AP Language and Composition


Read both texts:

 

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

 

These novels will be necessary for the first major assignment.